Pandora’s Sonos Integration Opens More Advertisers To The Connected Home

Pandora’s Smart Home strategy has been continuing with a series of steps designed to make the use of the streaming music platform easier for consumers as well as advertisers.

While listening to Pandora has been accessible on Sonos’ speakers for years, the two brands have partnered on new ways for listeners to employ voice-activation controls.

In keeping with Pandora’s philosophy that “voice is the new touch,” listeners can now control Sonos directly through the Pandora mobile app and command Pandora stations with spoken commands via Alexa. The new experience also includes support for Premium, Pandora’s on-demand service launched earlier this year.

In terms of the marketing potential for Pandora, which has an Alexa Skill in the Amazon Echo — as well as a similar presence on Google Home’s voice-activated assistant — this new integration on Sonos will be an opportunity for advertisers to expand their potential audience reach, as its app users have more ways and places to listen.

For Pandora, this expanded alliance with Sonos is another example of what it considers to be a huge opportunity to reach audiences through connected home and voice-activated devices.

“Pandora listeners love the in-home music experience we’ve created with Sonos, having logged over 250 million hours this year alone,” said Chris Phillips, Chief Product Officer, Pandora. “We have made it easier than ever to control your home audio listening experience by adding beautifully designed features inside the Pandora app to control your Sonos.”

More than 50 percent of Sonos owners across the country use Pandora throughout their home, the company said, as Pandora’s platform is available on more than 48 million activations on consumer electronics devices generally.

“Sonos owners have enjoyed their favorite Pandora stations in any room since the service joined the Sonos platform back in 2007,” said Allen Mask, VP of Partnerships at Sonos. “It is now easier for listeners to access and control all of their music from Pandora, whether it’s from the Sonos app, with voice, and now from within the Pandora app – all working together seamlessly.”

The adoption rate of smart speakers with voice assistants grew 140 percent from 2015 to 2016, according to a survey from music streaming service Pandora and Edison Research.

In particular, Pandora usage on these devices grew by a 282 percent year-over-year.

In Pandora’s 2018 Definitive Guide to Audio, which was released last month, the streaming music platform has been attempting to make the case that the latest shift to Connected Intelligence-based devices represents another leap past terrestrial radio. In essence, the rise of voice-activated devices extract all kinds of data from the Knowledge Graph and therefore create even more personalized experiences for consumers.

With that growth in mind, Pandora sought to get a sense of how the rise of devices such as Amazon’s Alexa, Apple’s Siri, Google Assistant, and Microsoft’s Cortana is opening up new opportunities for marketers to reach multiple household members in contextually relevant ways they couldn’t before.

The research bears out much of what NPR found in its examination of the role of voice-activation and consumers’ media usage this past summer. Roughly 65 percent of people who own an Amazon Echo or Google Home can’t imagine to going back to the days before they had a smart speaker, and 42 percent of that group say the voice-activated devices have quickly become “essential” to their lives, NPR’s research said.

Among the obvious points both NPR and Pandora’s separate studies found: listening to music was the initial reason people sought these devices for. But the use cases of have quickly mushroomed.

In last week’s kick off its first dedicated ad targeting program aimed at voice-activated devices with Nestlé Waters, Eric Hoppe, Director of Product Management at Pandora, told us how Smart Home devices required specific ad formats, as opposed to repurposed ones.

“We see targeting through connected-home devices as an opportunity for both brand building and a way to drive store visits,” said Hoppe. “Audio acts as a powerful tool to establish an emotional connection with audiences, and connected devices offer an even greater level of intimacy, particularly within the home where listeners are more receptive and their environment acts as a contextual trigger. Pandora on connected-devices can drive very specific results and actions through data and technology – advertisers can target more than 2,000 audience segments with the right message at the right time, based on brand objectives.”

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What Do Brands Need To Know About Using Amazon Alexa?

Even as Walmart rolls out voice-activated shopping via Amazon Echo’s Alexa and 40 million Millennials are ready to use Connected Intelligence-powered devices to order holiday gifts, most brands continue to wrestle with the implications of audio.

In a presentation at The LBMA’s Retail Loco in Atlanta last week, Noelle LaCharite, senior technical program manager for Amazon Alexa Machine Learning, offered some clear guidelines for how brands should navigate the use of voice-activation for marketing purposes.

Among her four-point outline for brands, LaCharite’s basic recommendations are:

Avoid Feature Creep. Keep It Simple. “Don’t overwhelm your users with features out of the box. Voice is a new way for users to interact with your product. Keep it simple and grow from there.”

As Natural Conversation As Possible. “Try to make your utterances as natural as they possibly can. Top Tip: Have a real world conversations with one another to create these.”

Core Business Functionality As A Minimum. “It’s important to do the fundamentals right. If you are a news company. Your users will naturally expect you to at least provide the news. Do the extra features later.”

Utilize The Built In Library. “There are hundreds of entities that Alexa can understand using the Built-In library. You can handle this in your skill by simply including them in your interaction model and respond with a useful response.”

GeoMarketing: What should brands know about Alexa’s capabilities as a marketing vehicle? Are you surprised at how much they know or how little they know?

Noelle LaCharite: People are not in a voice-first world yet. So, my goal is to be very aspirational in nature, and just expose the idea of “What would it look like if your brand thought about voice?”

The biggest question is what does your brand even sound like? It’s not something most brands have had to think about. But it’s actually there in some of the most well-known places. For example, most people know what the game show Jeopardy sounds like. You immediately have that tune in your head when the name is mentioned. You don’t have to explain anything. It’s almost common language, but it’s hard to put words around it. And yet, everyone immediately recognizes what it means.

You don’t even have to see Jeopardy. That’s what brands have to achieve now. Most brands haven’t even thought through what ear-cons are, those different sounds, chimes, audio signifiers that identify a brand without additional explanation. That is going to be so important for brands to grasp as consumers shift to a voice-first world.

Amazon Echo Alexa Dot

GeoMarketing’s Lauryn Chamberlain recently spoke to the BirchBox CEO Katia Beauchamp about the way the way Alexa has influenced the way consumers get information. So we’ll pose the same question we did to her: Does the rise of voice-activation call into question the need for a website, or the primacy of a website for brands?

The easiest thing for people to do to be successful is just to look at what are the top 10 things people do on their website. And some of them aren’t going to be top tier ranking. Some of them are going to be three clicks down or 10 clicks down. So find out what those are and make those your first things that you do. We call it the “minimum remarkable product.”

So now, brands are going to have to figure out what’s the most popular thing people are already asking for and make that a top-level indicator of intent in order to get the best interaction.

While Alexa is mostly thought of as powering the Echo in the living room or kitchen, it’s also there on your phone, in the Amazon app. Should brands be thinking of the way Alexa can tie on-the-go and at-home experiences together?

Right, Alexa on the Echo and on your phone within the Amazon shopping app is still the same Alexa.

As an example, one of my Alexa skills is daily affirmation and it’s you can do it while you’re shopping or you can do it sitting on your couch, and it’s the same experience. That’s that contextual experience we’re shooting for. So we want people to be able to say the same thing, the same way, whether they’re standing in front of their washer and dryer, in front of their fridge, or in the aisle of some store.

When we talk to retailers, there’s a lot of interest in using Alexa as a virtual sales assistant to help people while they’re browsing in a brick-and-mortar store. Do you think of those use cases as well?

From an aspirational perspective, absolutely. We’re not actively doing anything like that at the moment, but at the core, the Echo is a customer experience device. So how could you not only delight them in-store, out of store. Because someone already has Alexa on their mobile app, we’re always trying to imagine what could you do to make any brand that you either sell or associated with be more successful.

The challenge, obviously, is, with voice, if you’re in a crowded store, it’s difficult to kind of narrow down what one person is saying. Then you have to think about using voice remotes or a push button. One of the crazy ideas could be to create a phone booth that you step in and close the door.

That’s part of the brainstorming we’re constantly doing. The possibilities really are endless and that’s what’s so exciting about the emergence of voice activation.

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Target Adds Google Voice Assistant Shopping Nationwide

Target is the latest brick-and-mortar brand to sign on to accept requests made by owners of the Google Home through their voice-activated Google Assistant (aka “Okay, Google”) for delivery or pickup via its local online shopping marketplace Google Express.

In essence, the arrangement represents an expansion of Target’s existing use of Google Express.

Starting today, Target shoppers at most of its 1,800 stores in the United States can access items through Google Express and with the Google Assistant (except for Alaska and Hawaii). Target will offer two-day delivery, as well as free shipping for any orders over $35, Google says in a blog post.

Coming In 2018

Most of the capabilities of shopping through Google Express won’t be available until 2018. For example, after the new year, Target customers will also be able to use their Target loyalty membership through REDcard to get 5 percent off most Target purchases and free shipping when using Google Express. In addition, in 2018, Target shoppers will be able to link their Target.com and Google accounts, so the service will remember all their favorite items.

“We’re teaming up with Google to create innovative digital experiences using voice and other cutting-edge technologies to elevate Target’s strength in style areas such as home, apparel and beauty,” Target says. “Work is underway for Google and Target teams to bring this all to life.”

In August, Walmart unveiled plans to rollout a similar voice-activated shopping via Google Express and Google Home tools for its 4,700 U.S. stores and its fulfillment network “to create customer experiences that don’t currently exist within voice shopping anywhere else,” including choosing to pick up an order in store (often for a discount) or using voice shopping to purchase fresh groceries across the country.

These partnership on voice-activation comes roughly a year after Google Home debuted as a Connected Home product to augment Google Assistant.

“Shopping isn’t always as easy as it should be,” Sridhar Ramaswamy, SVP for Ads and Commerce, said in a blog post at the time of the Walmart deal’s announcement “When was the last time you needed to pick up something from the store but didn’t have the time to make the trip? Or you went to the store only to realize they didn’t have the brand you wanted? Wouldn’t it be nice if you could get what you want, however you want, from the stores where you already shop? We launched Google Express and shopping on the Google Assistant to do just that: make it faster and easier for you to shop your stores like Costco, Target and  Walmart.”

Okay, Google, Target shoppers are ready to talk.

Target’s Many Omnichannel Steps

For Target, the expanded Google partnership follows a series of steps designed to tackle one of the primary challenges facing its omnichannel strategy by rivals like Amazon. In August, for example, Target acquired transportation tech company Grand Junction to promise same-day delivery to customers to match one of key appeals of Amazon’s discount shopping subscription program, Prime.

It’s the latest salvo store brand has taken to meet consumers’ demands in the age of Amazon and e-commerce. Those demands include personalized recommendation and satisfying customers’ purchasing preferences, such as online shopping/in-store pickup.

But as Amazon has expanded its discounts and two-day shipping with its Prime membership option, and has just heralded its Instant Pickup option, retailers have turned to one advantage they still possess — at least for the moment — in relation to Amazon: proximity to their customers and known inventory, which makes it possible to offer the ultimate convenience of letting someone click “buy” and then having it brought to them within a few hours.

The Rise Of Connected Intelligence, The Knowledge Graph

In general, the adoption of voice-activation and on-demand delivery/pickup follows the wider capabilities stemming from the rise of Connected Intelligence and the Knowledge Graph, which have propelled personalized, one-to-one connections between brands and digital assistants such as Amazon’s Alexa, Apple’s Siri, Google Assistant, Microsoft’s Cortana, and Samsung’s Bixby as they enter the mainstream of consumer behavior.

While Amazon’s Alexa has assumed an early position as a leading voice-activated assistant, Google has stepped up its push into the space as its aligns its services to brick-and-mortar brands such as Panera Bread, which became one of the first national restaurant chains to begin offering voice-activated ordering and payment through Google Assistant.

The voice-activated ordering is currently available in Panera’s hometown of St. Louis and at its six locations in the Silicon Valley area. A full rollout of voice ordering is expected to come to all of Panera’s 2,000-plus U.S. locations by the end of the year, the company has said.

Other national brands that have formally aligned with Google’s voice-activated virtual assistant to accept spoken orders via the delivery marketplace Google Express, including Costco, Guitar Center, Kohl’s, L’Occitane, Payless, PetSmart, Road Runner Sports, Sur La Table, Ulta, Walgreens, and Amazon’s Whole Foods.

In the case of Target, the retailer has been aggressively — and at times, fitfully — revising its omnichannel strategy. For example, earlier this year, it decided to abandon its sub rosa e-commerce program called Goldfish, which was dubbed as the “store of the future.”

Before that, in August 2015, Target started a beacon program with Estimote to round out its in-store sales assistance. It’s unclear how vital the beacon program has been — or even whether Target has continued to use it —  since the company has not discussed those efforts publicly. Along the way, Target’s experiments with interactivity has included retail pop-ups and a showcase IoT-based connected home store in San Francisco.

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